“Flowers For Peace” Available Now on BandCamp

RodWebber-flowers for peace

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ROD WEBBER BAND CD RELEASE/ BURNING VERMIN FEST

rod webber cd release burning vermin supremeOn Sept. 5th, The Rod Webber Band will play a set at Burning Vermin in Croydon, New Hampshire to celebrate the release of Rod’s 20th studio recording “Flowers for Peace”– and of course to help Vermin Supreme raise money for his presidential campaign.

The CD was recorded with Peter Philis at Studio 125 in Sacramento, California. Pete played drums, and engineered all the tracks which were played live, with the exception of bass which was dubbed in later.

BURNING VERMIN PALOOZA-ROO FESTI STOCK CAMPOUT JAMBOREE !! Sept. 5,6,7.

Several Days of Peace, Love, Hyperbole, and Lies, Including Musical Acts and Special Guests.
Vermin Supreme will be making a very important announcement!!
Be a part of this historical event.

FUN !!! GAMES !!! PRIZES !!!

Vermin Supreme2016 is attempting to reach the threshhold for federal matching funds.  We need to raise 5k in each of 20 states ( in sums of up to $250) in order to do so.
We will use any proceeds for a presiDental primary tour and producing wacky stunts,along with awesome swag to give to doners.  All funds raised MUST be spent on legitimate camPain expenses during the primaries.

THE ROAD TO THE WHITE HOUSE BEGINS HERE.  GET READY PEOPLE !

No one will be turned away for having too much or too little money.
Volunteers needed for set up Thursday and Friday before the event.

SHARE AND INVITE ALL YOUR FRIENDS !! TAKE BACK AMERICA !!!

“Burned My Feet On Meat Street” reviewed by Louisville Music News

RodWebberCD
Rod Webber – Burned My Feet On Meat Street

Burned My Feet On Meat Street (Psychic Audio)

For the unexposed, Massachusetts native Rod Webber delivers a volatile mix of what’s been labeled industrial-electronic alterna-pop that delivers it’s own particular flavor of Caucasian hip-hop. Burned My Feet On Meat Street takes the listener through the near-psychotic isolation of Webber’s recovery a one-year prison stay, imposed for carrying a toy gun while filming a college art film.

Even though much of his post-incarceration neurosis might have been prevented by a competent lawyer, we are still left with a little gem of techno post-adolescent frustration that grows with each listen. Cuts like “Blister” and “Black Sheets” tell of fear, isolation and the lost years of a soul dealing with what may or may not be a society out to get us. Propelled by a Duke Ellington sample, “Black Sheets” provides a chilling look at isolation, to a reverb-drenched military march (a.k.a. a well-programmed drum machine). The song builds with Webber delivering a primal scream of release as the track ends.

“Killing Me” has more of an upbeat pop feel and explores the timeless pop subject of two people repressing a shared attraction. To the intended recipient of the message, Webber pleads “Please see it in my eyes/You’re feeding the fire/It’s feeding the fire.”

Despite a tendency to overuse television samples, Webber brings a welcome economy to his craft. with no track clocking in at over 4:29. Such length provides focus for the more ambiguous subjects while avoiding the dreaded self-indulgent verbal diarrhea that can cause one to reach for the “Eject” button. The advance word on Meat Street proffered a Beck-like creative approach, but to my ears, it sounded something like the Velvet Underground, had VU been in their prime in the mid-Nineties.

It’s reported that Webber has assembled a five-piece band and is undertaking a series of live gigs, while the corporate labels decide if this brand of angry industrial music merits a larger platform to perform on. It will be interesting to hear how live musicians will interpret these techno-ditties and to see if Webber’s vision expands to the next level. But for now, experience Meat Street in isolation, from whence it came.